Categories
BLOG

3 week old seedling

3 to 4 week old seedlings too small?

fatboyOGOF
Well-Known Member

I’ve grown for quite awhile, took a year break and am growing again. I planted these seedlings about 4 weeks ago. I don’t recall seedlings being this small after a month.

i moved and my water is a bit harder and i used supersoil instead of a soil without ferts.

any idea why these seem to have stopped growing? I’m using a 250 watt MH for veg. i don’t believe i overwatered them.

because the soil had nutes i haven’t used any yet. the genetics are all F2s i bred and are all good quality.

because i’m lazy and didn’t get to the hydro store, i just used soil, no perlight, guano etc.

travon
Member

I’ve grown for quite awhile, took a year break and am growing again. I planted these seedlings about 4 weeks ago. I don’t recall seedlings being this small after a month.

i moved and my water is a bit harder and i used supersoil instead of a soil without ferts.

any idea why these seem to have stopped growing? I’m using a 250 watt MH for veg.

because the soil had nutes i haven’t used any yet. the genetics are all F2s i bred and are all good quality.

because i’m lazy and didn’t get to the hydro store, i just used soil, no perlight, guano etc.

keico
Well-Known Member

I agree with the above 3-4 weeks they should be much bigger.

Some questions for you. ?

How far away is the lights, and what is your temperature also

I also see you your seedling are suffering from nute burn. That soil is to hot for seedings.

The super soil is to be used after you have established a good root system.

Just hope they survive

fatboyOGOF
Well-Known Member

yep, 4 weeks since they popped out of the soil. the NPK is 0.14 – 0.09 – 0.02.

i was hoping the reaction would be they don’t look too small! lol.

i’ve used supersoil for seedlings before and didn’t notice any problems. i’m thinking it’s the hardness of the water as i never had problems before at my old place. different cities a few miles apart.

the seedlings in the larger pot were just put into cups. i mixed in a good amount of perlight this time. man i’m bummed. i guess i’ll start again. i always breed so i have plenty of seedlings.

i may have to acutally buy reefer! outrageous!

fatboyOGOF
Well-Known Member

I agree with the above 3-4 weeks they should be much bigger.

Some questions for you. ?

How far away is the lights, and what is your temperature also

I also see you your seedling are suffering from nute burn. That soil is to hot for seedings.

The super soil is to be used after you have established a good root system.

Just hope they survive

lights are far enough. maybe 6 to 8 inches. i check the heat with my hand. room temp is in the 70s so that is fine.

you think that’s nute burn huh? makes sense. i had things dailed in so well for so long it’s odd to be off to such a bad restart. i think i may toss them all and start over with some black gold soil which was all i used for 15 years. i hate new neighborhoods. thanks guys. i’m going shopping tomorrow and will do it right this time. crap! being lazy always gets me in trouble!

Pipe Dream
Well-Known Member
fatboyOGOF
Well-Known Member

i went from this:

to the seedlings. bummer!

travon
Member

yep, 4 weeks since they popped out of the soil. the NPK is 0.14 – 0.09 – 0.02.

i was hoping the reaction would be they don’t look too small! lol.

i’ve used supersoil for seedlings before and didn’t notice any problems. i’m thinking it’s the hardness of the water as i never had problems before at my old place. different cities a few miles apart.

the seedlings in the larger pot were just put into cups. i mixed in a good amount of perlight this time. man i’m bummed. i guess i’ll start again. i always breed so i have plenty of seedlings.

i may have to acutally buy reefer! outrageous!

fatboyOGOF
Well-Known Member

i appreciate your comments guys. i smiling but only because i’m still smoking some sensi star.

i’m going to toss em and start over. i hate losing a month as i spent the last 12 months chomping at the bit to grow again but after all the stress they have gone through, i’m not going to waste another 2 to 3 months for a tiny harvest.

i’m retired so it’s not like i have anything else to do!

robert 14617
Well-Known Member
fatboyOGOF
Well-Known Member

here you go. i just tossed some sensi seeds in and put a bit of soil on top. they were not deep enough as some roots popped out of the soil. lol. jeeze i feel like a newb. Haste makes waste. i just ordered 20 matanuska tundra beans from doc chronic. good thing i practiced first!

robert 14617
Well-Known Member
fatboyOGOF
Well-Known Member

yep. i transplanted them this morning. the roots from all the other seedlings are white and healthy but this stunted growth is too much.

i like this site. you guys are alright! after the overgrow blowup i just don’t post much anymore. fatboyOGOF (overgrow old fart!)

robert 14617
Well-Known Member

we all make simple mistakes thats why we get together on these sites we learn from each other ,good or bad . rob
chck out the grow FAQ’s just packed with great info
What are some causes of slow plant growth?

Contributed by: tOkE_tHe_DoPe
Thanks to: Ranger2000, 10k, Hopefulgrower, Snoofer
Submitted: 15-02-2003

Overwatering
Soil moisture that is not absorbed rapidly turns stagnant; the plant quickly uses up any oxygen within the water, then is unable to respire further, resulting in moisture low in o2. Pythium thrives in low-oxygen (anaerobic) conditions.

In short, overwatering will slowly suffocate your roots, preventing sufficient oxygen uptake by the roots, and ultimately causing root rot.

Soil with high bark content
This can cause a “bonsai” effect. The roots will not be able to grow through the bark, preferring to grow around the chunks of bark. This slows down root growth and most obviously plant growth. Ive encounter this recently; once transplanted into proper soil, they have shown remarkable recovery.

[Editor’s note: bark is quite acidic, may may afect soil water pH]

Light deprivation
Although your plant may be receiving light, particular strains may require higher light levels than others. A recommended light level for full bud development is 50 watts/m2. Full sunlight is 100,000 lumens max.

Low nutrient strength
The plant is unable to acquire the necessary amounts of nutrients to sustain high growth rates. Large and mature plants can take higher nutrient strengths.

Nutrient strength is also related to the light intensity; plants under fluorescent lights usually require a lower nutrient concentration than under HIDs.

Nutrient lockup
Adding too much of a nutrient (ex. Magnesium) can “lockup” one or more nutrients, rendering them chemically unavailable to the plant. Nutrient lockup can occur at extreme pH ranges (ie. under 5.0, over 7.0).

Light spectrum
Light that does not contain enough red spectrum (too much blue)
Light spectrum can have a dramatic effect on plant growth, with different ligh frequencies affecting different photosynthetic processes within the leaf. Selecting a blue spectrum in a vegetative growth phase is preferred, with red spectrum in flowering.

pH
pH is too high or too low (ie. acidic soil. The plants come out as mutants).
Plants are unable to absorb nutrients, or in adequate quantities within certain pH ranges. Optimum pH varies with each medium. Hydroponics and aeroponics: 5.6-5.8. Soilless: 6.0-6.3 Soil: 6.5-7.0.

Many soilless mixtures can be fairly acidic, due to their high % bark content.

Low temperatures
Plant metabolism will decrease at low temperatures. Chemical reactions within the plant will take longer. Optimum plant growth often requires close temperature regulation; daytime temperatures between 25C and 30C are preferred. Differences in daytime and nighttime temps should not be dramatic, as this difference may shock the plant.

howdy. I've grown for quite awhile, took a year break and am growing again. I planted these seedlings about 4 weeks ago. I don't recall seedlings being…

Cannabis Growth Timelapse: One Chapter at a Time (With Pictures)

Last updated: May 4, 2020

The growth of a cannabis plant can be divided into 5 main chapters: germination, seedling, vegetative, flowering, and finally, budding. Within these stages of growth, many changes occur to the plant that should be noted and carefully watched for by the grower. Here, we’re going to dive into these different stages, to give you an idea of how long things generally take and what to keep an eye out for during cannabis growth.

Chapter 1: Germination

This is where it all begins, the seed. During this formative stage of growth the cannabis seed, once planted or placed in a germination station, breaks apart and the spindly taproot emerges looking for nutrients.

Featured Image Credit: High Times

1-week-old plant

The seed should be hard, dry and darker brown to grey before being used. Younger seeds won’t “pop” as readily. It can take up to a week to 10 days for the plant to finally emerge from its seed, but once it finally does it is ready to be transferred into a more permanent location.

This is assuming the grower is using a germination technique that doesn’t involve direct planting, otherwise, they simply need to wait for the plant to sprout to begin the seedling phase.

Chapter 2: Seedling

As the taproot of the germinated plant begins to take hold, the first set of iconic fan leaves begin to develop. This signals the beginning of the plant’s seedling stage of growth and should be placed in a large growing area immediately if it hasn’t been done so already.

2-week-old plant

The first leaves should be developing at this point, which the plant uses to photosynthesize light into nutrients.

It will grow a bit taller and begin to straighten up during this week. The very first new growths will appear as well, which will be another leaf along with the development of additional blades on the current leaves. Initially, they will be quite small.

Featured Image Credit: Big Buds Mag

3-week-old plant

A healthy plant will start turning a more vibrant green color and those blades will finally start becoming sizable, it will start looking more and more like a marijuana plant at this point. Once these seedlings fully develop these initial leaves and blades, they will be considered maturing and move onto the next stage of growth.

Chapter 3: Vegetative

After those initial leaves develop the plants begin to enter a stage of explosive growth. This is the vegetative stage. A healthy vegetative stage is the period of growth most associated with great yields, as the size of the plant can make a huge difference at the end of it all.

This is also the stage with the greatest variability for the length of time it will take to get through, dependent on strains and growing conditions.

It can last anywhere from 3-16 weeks, so knowledge of the particular strain being used is crucial here.

4-6 week-old plant

Somewhere in this time-frame is generally when the sex of a plant can be determined. The pre-flowers develop here, though they can be quite small, and once sex is determined it is time to separate the males from the females before any fertilization can take place.

Sexing can technically wait until the flowering stage, but cautious growers should remove them now.

Featured Image Credit: 101GrowLights

7-12 week-old plant

The length of the vegetative stage of growth is dependent on the genetics of the plant, as well as the period of time they are receiving light. Plants can technically remain in the vegetative state pretty much indefinitely, but eventually, it will hit its max growth or the amount of growth comfortable for the room and need to be switched over to flowering.

There will be a ton of foliage at this point and the plants will want more water than seems possible. Any training should be done at this stage, as long as the plant is healthy and growing rapidly.

Chapter 4: Flowering

This is the final stage of cannabis growth. All the previous work keeping the plant healthy and structurally sound pays dividends here as the plants begin to produce their buds. All males need to be removed at this point, otherwise, fertilization will occur and the females will lose a fair amount of yield and quality.

Flowering is triggered by the light cycle shifting to 12 hours on and off, so the timing of it will vary from grow to grow but this generally begins around week 13 of a grow.

13-14 week-old plant

This is the transition phase. It technically isn’t flowering at this point, but the plant will begin preparing for bud growth. The biggest growth occurs in this short period, the structure it develops within the vegetative stage is important now as the plant can almost double in height during this transition.

Towards the end of these transition weeks, the first wispy, white hairs known as pistils will begin developing. These are what eventually will become the buds that you’re after.

Featured Image Credit: Reddit

15-16 week-old plant

Those pistils will begin developing larger and larger and become darker in color. This is also when the odor from the plant becomes very apparent, so a good filtration system is a must at this point for indoor grows.

The growth of the plant will begin to slow down here as well, eventually stopping altogether as the plant’s energy will be focused entirely on the buds.

Buds will not have grown too much at this point, so don’t worry if they are still fairly small.

Chapter 5: Budding

17 weeks and onward

The final stage of flowering will have begun at this point for most plants, and the length of time can be variable. Buds will begin to grow very quickly now, seemingly overnight turning into dense flowers all over the plant.

The rest of the growth is up to the plant, but when it seems to be getting close to harvest time flushing nutrients is important for a quality tasting harvest. Simply flush the plants with pH-balanced water and stop administering nutrients at this time to ensure a good harvest.

Featured Image Credit: Reddit

Conclusion

The weeks involved for each plant are variable for a lot of conditions, but this is a good general gist of what each week and group of weeks involve for standard cannabis grow.

Things like auto-flowering plants or quickly growing strains will heavily veer off this, but for the most part, following this guide will give a grower a good idea of what to expect each week of their growth.

Featured Image Credit: Pexels

Related Posts

How to Trim Cannabis Plants for the Best Buds

How to Cool a Hot Grow Tent (7 Tips & Tricks)

How to Control Humidity in Your Grow Tent

What You Need to Set Up a Grow Tent

Best Bud Trimmer Machines 2021 – Top Picks & Reviews

Best Grow Tents for the Money 2021 – Top Picks & Reviews

Cannabis Growth Timelapse: One Chapter at a Time (With Pictures) Last updated: May 4, 2020 The growth of a cannabis plant can be divided into 5 main chapters: germination, seedling,